The reality of Stefan Scholl

"I hope there's pudding"

Gibberish Bookmarklet

Most people are able to read and understand text, even if it is all gibberish. The first and last letter need to stay the same as the correct spelling. The letters in between can be ordered any way and it remains readable.

See:

Most poplee are able to read and userdatnnd txet, even if it is all gibsierbh. The fisrt and lsat letetr need to stay the same as the ccorert sllpieng. The lrteets in bweeten can be ordered any way and it rameins rdlabeae.

Bookmark (or better drag and drop it on the bookmark toolbar) the following bookmarklet: gibberish

Now you can click on the bookmarklet and convert any page into gibberish.

Much fun!

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Benchmarks are merciless


A number 1/4 for A vs. B means that B is 4 times slower than A.

The Computer Language Benchmarks Game is more a community benchmark than a programming language benchmark. You get some ballpark figures that confirm what you already know beforehand: C++ is faster than Ruby :-)

But it's still depressing to see that a current implementation of JavaScript is faster than Python. Comments

Bookmarklet for HQ Videos on YouTube

YouTube sometimes gives you an HQ button to switch to a version with higher quality. But not all videos have this button. You can add "&fmt=18" to the URL and most of the time the video is better than the default one.

Or you can bookmark (or better drag and drop it on the bookmark toolbar) the following bookmarklet: YouTube-HQ

This was done quick and dirty and may stop working tomorrow. It depends on the current HTML code on the page.

Just watch a video on YouTube and then select the bookmarklet. The page gets reloaded with "&fmt=18" attached to the URL. Comments

Binary Clock in the Sidebar

I have a binary wristwatch and had a simple binary clock in the sidebar for some time (no pun intended) now.

But now it looks a bit more like the real watch.



The first row shows the hours and the second row the minutes. It's 11:46 on this picture. 8 + 2 + 1 hours, 32 + 8 + 4 + 2 minutes.

It gets refreshed every minute via JavaScript. I'm using the <canvas> element of HTML 5. I wanted to give it a try for some time now.

It's supported by all current browsers, tested on MacOS X, Linux, and Windows XP.

MacOS X:
Linux:
  • Firefox 3.0.8
Windows:

Update: Removed after change of blogging software
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